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Mother's Day

A film so awful that if one were to put up a list of the great movies celebrating motherhood, it would rank considerably lower than…

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The Man Who Knew Infinity

An account of a remarkable person should strive to be as equally remarkable as its subject, not the timid and tidy boilerplate special of a…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Sheila O'Malley

Sheila O'Malley

Sheila O'Malley received a BFA in Theatre from the University of Rhode Island and a Master's in Acting from the Actors Studio MFA Program.

She writes film reviews and essays on actors for Capital New York, Fandor, Press Play, Noir of the Week, and the House Next Door. Her work has appeared in Salon.com and The Sewanee Review, where her essay about her father was featured in an Irish Literature issue.

O'Malley has performed her one-woman show "74 Facts and One Lie" all over Manhattan. She has read her personal essays at the prestigious Cornelia Street Cafe Writers Read series. O'Malley writes about actors, movies, books, and Elvis Presley at her popular personal site, The Sheila Variations.

Her first play, July and Half of August, recently had public readings at Theatre Wit in Chicago, and The Vineyard Theatre in New York. She is currently working on her second play, as well as a book about Elvis Presley in Hollywood. 

Read her answers to our Movie Love Questionnaire here.

Recent Reviews

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Men & Chicken
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Sing Street
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God's Not Dead 2
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The Dark Horse

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Men & Chicken

(2016)

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Sing Street

(2016)

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God's Not Dead 2

(2016)

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The Dark Horse

(2016)

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Everybody Wants Some!!

(2016)

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Born to Be Blue

(2016)

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Krisha

(2016)

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The Perfect Match

(2016)

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Marguerite

(2016)

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Cemetery of Splendour

(2016)

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Rolling Papers

(2016)

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Already Tomorrow in Hong Kong

(2016)

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Tumbledown

(2016)

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Michael Jackson's Journey from Motown to Off the Wall

(2016)

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The 5th Wave

(2016)

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Naz & Maalik

(2016)

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Henry Gamble's Birthday Party

(2016)

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Joy

(2015)

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Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip

(2015)

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Night Owls

(2015)

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Christmas, Again

(2015)

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Carol

(2015)

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Sweet Micky for President

(2015)

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Spotlight

(2015)

#274 April 8, 2016

Sheila writes: As I'm sure most of you know, April 4th marked the 3rd anniversary of Roger Ebert's death. There have been various tributes to him all week on Rogerebert.com, including an ongoing series called "Roger's Favorites." Throughout his career as a critic, Roger often championed actors and filmmakers, sometimes pointing them out to his audience before the wider culture had caught on. The editors at Rogerebert.com wrote essays on some of these favorites, and it's already become a rich archive. You can check out the full list here: Roger's Favorites: A Table of Contents.

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#273 March 27, 2016

Sheila writes: The lineup for Ebertfest 2016 (April 13-17 in Champaign, Illinois) 2016 is a stunner, starting from its opening film, Guillermo del Toro's gorgeous "Crimson Peak." (Del Toro will be a guest at Ebertfest as well.) The list of films and guests have been (mostly) finalized. There will be some fascinating panel discussions, as well as QAs with directors and actors following the screenings. You can check out the full Ebertfest schedule here.

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#272 March 9, 2016

Sheila writes: In Roger Ebert's Great Movies review of Martin Scorsese's "Taxi Driver," he writes: "The technique of slow motion is familiar to audiences, who usually see it in romantic scenes, or scenes in which regret and melancholy are expressed--or sometimes in scenes where a catastrophe looms, and cannot be avoided. But Scorsese was finding a personal use for it, a way to suggest a subjective state in a POV shotPOV shot...one of Scorsese's greatest achievements in 'Taxi Driver' is to take us inside Travis Bickle's point of view." I came across a wonderful video that shows Scorsese's storyboards for "Taxi Driver" alongside the actual filmed scenes.

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#271 February 22, 2016

Sheila writes: A really fun piece over on Mubi: Adrian Curry, who heads up Mubi's popular movie-poster column, interviews Mondo creative director and poster-designer Jay Shaw. Shaw provides commentary for his Top Ten American Movie Posters. It's an eclectic selection. Some of the designs were not used, ultimately, like the Bill Gold design for "Get Carter" below, but still worthy of appreciation.

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#270 February 6, 2016

Sheila writes: The great Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki has enthralled audiences for 40 years with his beautiful and sensitive films, filled with supernatural elements, dream-like images, and a vibrant sense of the small moments that make up human existence. Video-essayist Lewis Bond (you can view more of his work here) created a short documentary about Miyazaki called "Hayao Miyazaki: The Essence of Humanity." Here it is, in full. Enjoy!

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